5.0 out of 5 stars Great Reading, October 6, 2012
By Newark
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This review is from: "...and Remember that I Am a Man." (Kindle Edition)
This is a story of Moses life as a slave. It is very well written. You feel the hope and the sadness he goes through in his life. The trials he has in trying to be a free man. This is one book that once started it is very hard to put down. I recommend it a very good read.




4.0 out of 5 stars What a Journey!, November 21, 2012
By Geda
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This review is from: "...and Remember that I Am a Man." (Kindle Edition)
Wow! Moses went through some hard times! This book put me through so many emotions. The measure of a man personified! Great read!



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5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful story of perseverance and triumph, January 21, 2013
By Susan
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This review is from: "...and Remember that I Am a Man." (Kindle Edition)
Moses is a strong and smart man, who has a long road to travel to earn the respect he deserves. This is a motivating and captivating tale. And remember that i am man was the best book I read in 2012.



5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!!, February 13, 2013
By PaganDeva2000 "pagandeva2000" (Queens, New York) -
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This review is from: "...and Remember that I Am a Man." (Kindle Edition)
This book was offered as s freebie. However, it was phenomenal. Brought tears to my eyes because I saw what our ancestors have experienced to bring us where we are today. I salute them and thank them.




1.0 out of 5 stars Call me when you figure out that this still applies to women., February 8, 2013
By KathyD
This review is from: "...and Remember that I Am a Man." (Kindle Edition)
Call me when you figure out that this still applies to women. That's nice. The original didn't include men of color. It still doesn't apply to women. The ERA didn't pass. We're legislated at every turn. So frankly, take your sob story and sell it elsewhere.









4.0 out of 5 stars the war through unbiased eyes, August 23, 2012
By Furio (Genova - Italy)
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This review is from: Necessary Evil (Paperback)
I have no way to ascertain whether what is told in this short novel is accurate in any way: the historical facts I might probably dig out off some history book but Chamorro culture and the workings of a Chamorro teenager of the times are bound to remain a mystery to me.

Within this cautionary scope, the story told here is simple, straightforward and convincing. Tadtaotao is a great character: he would be a child in Western civilizations but he is a young men in his and his unbiased view on war and on Japanese and Americans is unforgettable. He has no love for neither and he is not cutting any slack to either. Used to be more or less alone, to be an outcast, to care for a sick adoptive parent until she is killed, he becomes, in some of the best paragraphs, an iconic, tragic figure full of dignity.
Mr Bushore is wise enough not to overindulge in sappy descriptions and let us do our own sentimental math which is an excellent idea.

Writing is simple and to the point with only the occasional typo to disturb the reading experience.


5.0 out of 5 stars Necessary Evil is a Necessary read, February 19, 2012
By
raday
This review is from: Necessary Evil (Paperback)
John Bushore has written historic novel that feel like history. He has captured the feel of WWII through the eyes of a little boy.
The book tells a tale that brings up points of the entrance to the atomic age and the destruction of a civilization that need to be voiced.
Thanks John for a refreshing view on this topic.


4.0 out of 5 stars Historical Made Interesting for YA Audience, February 13, 2012
By
Marva Dasef "YA Fantasy Author" (Eugene, OR)
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This review is from: Necessary Evil (Kindle Edition)
Tadtaotao (Tad) is a native Charmorra boy living on the speck of an island in the Marianas named Tinian. Nobody would think that this tiny dry spot in the sea would have such a major role in history, and yet few people have heard of it.

This novella begins with Tad's situation. He is an orphan adopted by a woman living in a leper colony on the island. So, quit whining if you think you've got life bad. Tad takes care of his adoptive nana by trading for food, spear fishing, and begging for medicine for his leprosy-stricken caretaker. He's more the caretaker when the Japanese decide that Tinian is a nice spot to use as a headquarters to send out strikes against the allies, those nasty and evil Americans.

July 1944 turns the tables as the Americans take Saipan and Guam. Tad's adoptive mother is killed in an American attack. This doesn't give the boy much confidence the Americans will be any better than the Japanese who ran the island before the invasion. Tad does see the opportunity of the Americans' garbage piles as a source of food. What is garbage to a rich bunch like the Americans is a bonanza for an orphan.

Tad is grabbed by a sentry and, when found to be just a harmless boy, is adopted by the mess staff (all black cooks, of course). He's given a job, has plenty to eat, and even a bunk of his own.

Tad is a curious boy. He watches the planes come and go on the newly-reinforced airstrips left by the Japanese. Then, a new type of aircraft arrives. The B-29 Flying Fortresses fly in and start the process of fire-bombing Japan into submission. It doesn't work. The Japanese are a proud people, certain in the righteousness of their cause (where have we heard this crap before?).

When a new type of B-29 hits the airfield, Tad's curiosity is piqued. Why are these new planes loaded from a pit with a seriously monstrous bomb? Then, one day, Tad notices the B-29s have been modified. Their group numbers and other identification have been changed. Clearly, they're being disguised to look like the rest of the bombers using the base, yet they're different.

Okay, it's not a spoiler to say that one of those bombers happened to be named Enola Gay and that it carried the most devastating weapon of mass destruction ever invented.

Tad is an excellent observer for us, the readers. This novella is a close look at an event we all know about, but perhaps don't know the details as observed by the Chamorra boy who just wanted to raid a garbage can.

The only thing I can say negative about this book is there's a lot of telling narrative. But I didn't mind because there's a lot of history here the reader needs to know. Mr. Bushore does an excellent job putting together the personal story of the boy with the huge historical consequences of the time. Well done.

5.0 out of 5 stars Make Me a Prisoner, Too!, September 1
4, 2009
By Marva Dasef "YA Fantasy Author" (Eugene, OR)
This review is from: The Prisoners of Gender (Paperback)
First off a disclaimer. I am not a regular reader of "spicy" literature. I write kids' books and I generally like to remain pure of heart (quit laughing, you people who know me!).

When John Bushore asked if I'd read "Prisoners of Gender" and I'd seen an excerpt, I enthusiastically agreed.

I'm not sorry. Hey, John! You're a hot guy! No MonkeyJohn kiddie books here for sure.

This is a wonderful fantasy, sexy, fun read.

Princess Marissa and gallant soldier Bardak are the victims of a badly handled curse. They switch bodies and have to learn to live with a huge change in their lives, all the while seeking the nasty Wizard who could make them swap back to their original bodies.

Marissa starts to like the rugged, strong, sexy male body she now occupies. Bardak is torn. He has sworn to protect the Princess, but the Princess is now in two places. Not only is he wearing her body, he has to also protect the mighty warrior occupied by the princess. Confusion ensues.

Well, you can see where the title comes from. As the two learn how to deal with their decidedly different circumstances, they bicker while being mightily attracted to their own bodies worn by the other person. I was reminded of Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy arguing it out in the 40's comedies which (way ahead of their time) showed gender prejudice for what it was--a stupid set of societal rules. Unfortunately, there are countries that still think along the lines of weaker-stronger sex.

John has shown this to be the false piece of lies that every feminist has known for years. His handling of Bardak in Marissa's body and Marissa in Bardak's shows his sensitivity to both sides of the physical spectrum.

Now, this is also a somewhat epic fantasy, which I define as set in an alternate fantasy world unrelated to the world in which we live. I say 'somewhat' only because the book is not 200,000 words long with way too many mighty thews. I'm not a fan of epic, so I really enjoyed John's take on the fully fantasy world that epic's usually inhabit.

The writing is crisp and fast-moving. "Prisoners" is a fun romp and a good fantasy book, too.

Stars? Hey, on a five-star scale, I'd give this one 4-1/2 at least. But since Amazon only goes with whole stars, I'll have to give it the full five.



4.0 out of 5 stars Nice Character Development, May 6, 2010
By Pioneer Pat (Portland, OR United States)
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This review is from: The Prisoners of Gender (Paperback)
The thing I really enjoyed about the book was the development of the characters in their different bodies. It had a realistic quality and the progression of the princess to a warrior was believable and enjoyable. The warrior as the princess had a nice start, but then fell short. It was almost as if the taboo of a man adapting to life as a woman was too large to cross. In the end, the princess grew from the experience, while the warrior reverted to his old self. While that aspect was disappointing, the whole read was enjoyable and the pace of the adventure along with the characters growth kept me excited until the end. I recommend it for a read, but caution regarding the ending which seems too stereotypical for a book breaking so many other norms.



5.0 out of 5 stars Enchanting!, June 4, 2010
By Samuel Rafael - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Prisoners of Gender (Kindle Edition)
I can't say enough positive things about this wonderful novel. It had my rapt attention and I didn't want it to end. Wonderfully written, it vividly captured the era of chivalry, kings, knights, and ladies of the court. But most of all, the author really understands what gender is all about and describes the human experience so vividly, that I was moved to tears. I can't wait until they turn it into a screenplay and make the movie!


4.0 out of 5 stars A Pleasant Surprise, June 23, 2011
By Kara J. Jorges "Avid Reader" (Minneapolis)
  (REAL NAME)  
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This review is from: The Prisoners of Gender (Paperback)
As soon as I read the premise of this novel, I wanted to rea it. I had no idea what to expect, but was rather pleasantly surprised. The plot begins like a typical historical romance when a princess and her handsome guard are taken prisoner and thrown together. But, from there the story takes a few unique turns. First, an inept wizard botches a spell, and Princess Marissa and Captain Bardak wind up exchanging bodies. I was impressed by the thoughtfulness and sensitivity in the plot that followed, as well as amused by some of the events that occurred. Another interesting twist was Princess Marissa's maid, Janelle, and their unique relationship. This novel could have explored many different angles, and did, though I must admit to a twinge of disappointment at one intriguing missed possibility I was hoping for. It was a small thing, and I found this an entertaining and sweet romance. I also enjoyed the unexpected twists and turns, while slightly amused by the heightened violence (which was not graphic), not often found in the genre. I'll read more by this author.



5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect!, July 27, 2012
By Susan Dubrovich "Sue Dubrovich" (Astoria, NY)
(REAL NAME)  
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This review is from: The Prisoners of Gender (Kindle Edition)
I loved this book so much. I just finished it while sitting at my desk pretending to work. Such a great story with very well written characters. .99 Kindle Books can be pretty hit or miss, and this was a definite hit! Just the right mix of adventure and romance.



  3.0 out of 5 stars Not what you might expect, April 16, 2011
Frank R. Errington "Heavy reader" (Norristown, PA) - See all my reviews  
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This review is from: Wolfwraith (Paperback)
Shadow Fletcher is an imperfect man. For one thing, he's missing an arm. He's also missing his family, now estranged, due to being falsely accused of inappropriately touching his 12 year old daughter. He's noticeably rusty in the dating arena and, oh yeah, he seems to have authority issues.

Shadow is a relatively new Park Ranger at False Cape State Park which is experiencing a spat of murders where some of the victims have had their throats slashed.

I know, you're thinking, typical Werewolf fare. Well, not quite. There are some nice surprises and a couple of likeable characters, and John did a nice job with the Category 4 Hurricane, but there were a number of sub-plots left unresolved and that left me feeling shortchanged.


5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding, April 7, 2011
By raday
This review is from: Wolfwraith (Paperback)
This book is GREAT. It was hard to put down. A very good read especially for those familiar with the Virginia Beach area. It reminded me of the genre of Tony Hillerman (may he rest in peace). I would love to hear more about Shadow and the rest of the characters.
Andrea Mccrae rated it 4 of 5 stars  (Goodreads)
An interesting look into the life of a young slave in the Dismal Swamp area of North Carolina and Virginia. This historical fiction is written in a way that appeals to my male students.

A fascinating read, June 5, 2014
By
Kindle Customer
Verified Purchase
This review is from: "...and Remember that I Am a Man." (Kindle Edition)
I loved this story. I would have liked to see more character interaction between Moses and Betsy, as well as Moses relationship with his children, but still lived the story.



5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous!, February 16, 2014
By
Janet Hickey
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This review is from: "...and Remember that I Am a Man." (Kindle Edition)
Very engaging story. I just could not put this book down. I felt a need to follow Moses in his journey and hope for a happy ending.


2.0 out of 5 stars Misleading, February 4, 2014
By
Rusty Thompson (Casselberry, FL United States)
This review is from: "...and Remember that I Am a Man." (Kindle Edition)
The blurb for this book is misleading. Thomas Jefferson wrote an entire paragraph about abolishing slavery in the original draft of the Declaration of Independence and the paragraph was considered acceptable by 11 of the 13 colonies, but was removed for fear that two of the southern colonies would not sign the Declaration and make it a unanimous vote.


5.0 out of 5 stars If ur looking for something different....., February 3, 2014
By
Amazon Customer "10 til 9" (Tallahassee, Fl)
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This review is from: "...and Remember that I Am a Man." (Kindle Edition)
Great read. Tale of perseverence hope betrayal determination. Moses is a slave by color only because in his mind and soul he's free. Please read.